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Louise Rumble

Expertise

Louise is a Partner in our Sydney office. Louise has extensive experience advising employers on the full range of workplace and safety issues with a focus on achieving commercial and pragmatic solutions. Louise has assisted public and private sector employers in various industries including arts, media, security services, professional services, shipping, infrastructure and oil and gas. 

Experience

Louiseā€™s experience includes:

  • acting for employers in State and Federal tribunals in respect of employment-related litigation including unfair dismissal claims, general protections claims, discrimination disputes and breach of contract claims
  • advising and assisting businesses in respect of the full cycle of employment, from negotiating employment contracts including senior executive agreements, advising during the employment relationship including disciplinary processes and managing ill and injured employees, through to the end of the employment relationship including negotiated separations, dismissals and redundancies
  • advising on obligations arising from the Fair Work Act 2009 and other employment-related legislation with a focus on achieving practical and commercial solutions for businesses
  • drafting workplace policies and training employees and senior managers on their obligations pursuant to those workplace policies
  • undertaking workplace investigations involving allegations of inappropriate workplace conduct
  • advising on compliance with industrial instruments and modern awards including providing strategic advice to franchisors and holding companies in respect of their obligations arising from the Vulnerable Workers amendment legislation
  • advising on employment-related aspects of corporate restructures including the transfer of business provisions
  • advising and defending employers in Fair Work Ombudsman investigations and prosecutions
  • advising and defending employers in safety related investigations and prosecutions.

Publications

24 November 2020 - Knowledge

Working from home: Employer not required to furnish home office with desk

#Workplace Relations & Safety, #COVID-19

The Fair Work Commission recently provided much needed guidance for COVID embattled employers, clarifying the lengths to which an employer is required to furnish an employee’s home office as a result of Government directives to work from home.

27 October 2020 - Knowledge

Minimum rates for Group 2 modern awards increase from 1 November 2020

#Workplace Relations & Safety

Following the Fair Work Commission’s Annual Wage Review decision, minimum wages for Group 2 modern awards will increase by 1.75 per cent from the first full pay period on or after 1 November 2020.

30 September 2020 - Knowledge

‘Genuine redundancy’ held despite similar new role created one month later

#Workplace Relations & Safety

A Fair Work Commission decision sheds light on whether a ‘genuine redundancy’ occurs when an employer creates a new role similar to the redundant role within one month of dismissing the employee.

16 September 2020 - Knowledge

JobKeeper direction that disproportionately reduced an employee’s hours deemed unreasonable

#Workplace Relations & Safety

The Fair Work Commission has reversed an ‘unreasonable’ JobKeeper enabling stand down direction that reduced an employee’s hours disproportionately to other team members and with no prior consultation.

19 August 2020 - Knowledge

High Court clarifies the meaning of a ‘day’ for personal/carer’s leave entitlement

#Workplace Relations & Safety

The High Court of Australia has allowed an appeal from a Full Federal Court judgment concerning how the entitlement to paid personal/carer's leave is calculated under the Fair Work Act 2009.

17 June 2020 - Knowledge

Court confirms long term casual employment is not all it seems

#Workplace Relations & Safety

A ruling from the Full Bench of the Federal Court has confirmed that annual leave, compassionate leave and personal leave is payable to employees who have been incorrectly regarded by employers as long-term casuals.

20 May 2020 - Knowledge

When can employees refuse an employer’s request to take annual leave under the new JobKeeper provisions?

#Workplace Relations & Safety, #COVID-19

We look at the Fair Work Commission’s first decision on a dispute arising from an employee who refused to take annual leave at half their regular rate while receiving the JobKeeper payment.

12 May 2020 - Knowledge

Managing employees with mental disabilities – an important reminder for employers

#Workplace Relations & Safety

A recent Federal Circuit Court decision demonstrates the need for employers to understand their obligations and exercise caution when managing employees with related or underlying mental health issues.

15 April 2020 - Knowledge

Are actors independent contractors or employees?

#Workplace Relations & Safety

A recent Federal Court decision that will have wide-ranging implications for the live performance industry has found three actors to be independent contractors rather than casual employees

12 February 2020 - Knowledge

Recent cases provide guidance on how to calculate an employee’s annual rate of earnings

#Workplace Relations & Safety

We review the relevant provisions and cases which inform whether an amount or benefit should be included in a calculation of an employee’s earnings for the purpose of determining eligibility for unfair dismissal.

19 August 2019 - Knowledge

To tweet or not to tweet: The High Court’s ruling on employee social media use

#Workplace Relations & Safety

Serving as a serious reminder to employees about their use of social media, the High Court has upheld Comcare’s appeal of an Administrative Appeals Tribunal decision which turned on whether an employee’s anonymous tweets criticising her employer were a lawful reason for dismissal.

09 April 2019 - Knowledge

To tweet or not to tweet: Employee social media use in the spotlight

#Workplace Relations & Safety

An employee’s termination of employment for posting for 9000 critical – and anonymous - tweets has prompted the question of whether there has been a could be a contravention of constitutional freedoms.